Noxious & Secondary Weeds Gallery and Factsheet - Nobles County, Minnesota
 Mode:  
  Login

Weed Complaints

Nobles County, Minnesota

Informative Links

Note: the links on this page marked with PDF Icon are PDF documents and will open with Adobe Reader. To download a FREE copy of this software, click the link below.

Get Adobe Reader

Adobe® and Adobe Reader® are registered trademarks of Adobe Systems, Inc.


Nobles County Environmental Services Staff

Wayne Smith
Environmental Services Director

wsmith@co.nobles.mn.us

(507) 295-5322 (p)
(507) 372-8348 (f)

Alan Langseth
Environmental Technician

alangseth@co.nobles.mn.us

 Contact Alan for all needs concerning

  • Feedlot Management
    Enforcement of Feedlot Ordinance
  • Agriculture Inspector
    Weed Complaints | Seed Inspector | Commercial Application Testing
  • On-Site Sewage - Private Septic Systems

Mark Koster
Environmental Officer

mkoster@co.nobles.mn.us

Contact Mark for all needs concerning


Nobles County Public Works Office

Stephen P. Schnieder
Director

960 Diagonal Road
PO Box 187
Worthington, MN 56187

(507) 295-5322 (p)
(507) 372-8348 (f)

sschnieder@co.nobles.mn.us


Back to Environmental Services Page

Noxious & Secondary Weeds Gallery and Factsheet

This page contains a listing of the Noxious and Secondary class weeds within Nobles County

Prohibited Noxious Class Weeds

The plants listed in this part are prohibited noxious weeds because they, are injurious to public health, the environment public roads, crops, livestock, and other property. Prohibited noxious weeds must be controlled or eradicated as required in Minnesota statutes

Note: If at any time you wish to return to the top of this page, click Top of Page.

Canada Thistle–Noxious Class Weed

Canada Thistle

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Perennial
Height: 1–4 ft.
Flowers: July–August

Distinguishing Marks: Forms colonies, leaf surface smooth with prickly margins. Flowers at the ends of the stem.

Wanted For: Invading almost every place in Minnesota. Can grow in wet or dry soil, especially on roadsides and pastures.

Top of Page

Bull Thistle–Noxious Class Weed

Bull Thistle

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Biennial
Height: 2–5 ft.
Flowers: All summer until frost

Distinguishing Marks: Prickly throughout especially on leaves and margins. Also look for hairs on the leaves, especially on the bottom.

Wanted For: Highly invasive in all soils, especially on roadsides and pastures.

Top of Page

Plumeless Thistle–Noxious Class Weed

Plumeless Thistle

Origin: Europe
Life Span: Perennial
Height: 1–4 ft.
Flowers: June until frost

Distinguishing Marks: Look for a prickly stem on this plant. The leaves are also very prickly. The flower heads are found singly or as clusters at the tip of the stem. No plume on the seeds.

Wanted For: Invading roadsides, pastures and waste places in Minnesota.

Top of Page

Musk Thistle–Noxious Class Weed

Musk Thistle

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Biennial
Height: 3–6 ft.
Flowers: June until frost

Distinguishing Marks: The flower bracts are purple, large and curve downward. The leaves are prickly with a wavy margin.

Wanted For: Invading roadsides, pastures and waste places in Minnesota.

Top of Page

Perennial Sowthistle–Noxious Class Weed

Perennial Sowthistle

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Perennial
Height: 2–4 ft.
Flowers: June–October

Distinguishing Marks: Yellow flowers at the ends of slender stems. Flowers look like dandelion flowers. Leaves near the ground with prickly margins.

Wanted For: Invading anywhere a seed can germinate. Will out-compete almost anything in its path.

Top of Page

Purple Loosestrife–Noxious Class Weed

Purple Loosestrife

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Perennial
Height: up to 8 ft.
Flowers: July–August

Distinguishing Marks: Tight clusters of purple flowers, sharply edged stem and leaves opposite and whorled at each node distinguish this invader.

Wanted For: Invading almost any shallow water in the state. Can out compete almost any other plants.

Warning: Do not spray areas posted for biological control.

Top of Page

Field Bindweed–Noxious Class Weed

Field Bindweed

Origin: Europe
Life Span: Perennial
Height: Vine up to 2 ft.
Flowers: May–September

Distinguishing Marks: A vine up to 2 ft. long with large trumpet shaped white flowers and arrowhead shaped leaves mark this plant.

Wanted For: Invading established plant communities as well as form fields and roadsides.

Top of Page

Hemp–Noxious Class Weed

Hemp

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Annual
Height: 3 to 9 ft.
Flowers: August until frost

Distinguishing Marks: Easily identified by leaf. Leaf is compound with 7 -9 leaflets which are toothed and have prominent veins.

Wanted For: Can be an intoxicant and is aggressive.

Top of Page

Leafy Spurge–Noxious Class Weed

Leafy Spurge

Origin: Eurasia
Life Span: Perennial
Height: 1.5 to 3 ft.
Flowers: Late spring/early summer and again in fall

Distinguishing Marks: Look for leaves crowded on the stems with a whitish color. Look for a milky juice when the leaves or stems are broken.

Wanted For: Being a highly invasive weed, crowding out almost anything in its way, and being almost impossible to kill.

Warning: Do not spray areas posted for biological control.

Top of Page

Poison Ivy–Noxious Class Weed

Poison Ivy

Origin: Native
Life Span: Perennial
Height: 6–12 inches (typical)
Flowers: May–July (looking for flowers is discouraged)

Distinguishing Marks: Look for leaves crowded on the stems with a whitish color. Look for a milky juice when the leaves or stems are broken.

Wanted For: Causing sometimes severe rash in susceptible people. Poison Ivy is also an invasive weed.

Top of Page

Mustard, Garlic–Noxious Class Weed

Mustard, Garlic

Origin: Europe
Life Span: Biennial Height: 1–4 ft.
Flowers: May

Distinguishing Marks: First year plants consist of a cluster of 3 or 4 round, scallop edged leaves rising 2 to 4 inches in a rosette. Second-year plants generally produce one or two flowering stems with numerous white flowers that have four separate petals.

Wanted For: This plant is a major threat to the survival of Minnesota's woodland herbaceous flora and the wildlife that depend on it.

Top of Page

Secondary Class Weeds

Cocklebur–Secondary Class Weed

Cocklebur

Origin: Native
Life Span: Annual
Height: 3–4 ft.
Flowers: July–September

Distinguishing Marks: Look for rough hairy stem, often spotted. Leaves are alternate triangular shaped, sometimes toothed or lobed. Woody stout taproot.

Wanted For: Invading open fields, gardens, pastures and waste areas, especially where receding water has exposed previously submerged land.

Warning: Seedlings in cotyledon stage are poisons to livestock.

Top of Page

Velvetleaf–Secondary Class Weed

Velvetleaf

Origin: India
Life Span: Annual
Height: 2–4 ft.
Flowers: July–October

Distinguishing Marks: Look for alternate heart shaped leaves covered with soft velvety pubescence. Seed is found in cup shaped pod about an inch in diameter with a ring of prickles about the upper edge. Also known as Buttonweed.

Wanted For: Invasion of row crops, especially later in the season after cultivation.

Warning: May cause an allergic skin reaction in susceptible individuals.

Top of Page

Wild Sunflower–Secondary Class Weed

Wild Sunflower

Origin: Native
Life Span: Annual
Height: 1–17 ft.
Flowers: July–September

Distinguishing Marks: Look for stiff stout course stem, freely branched above. Flowers are yellow ray with dark centers.

Wanted For: Invading cultivated fields, pastures, roadsides and waste areas.

Top of Page